Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Origami Dragons at Paper Tree

I was passing through the Buchanan Street Mall in Japantown yesterday & discovered that The Paper Tree is hosting a collection of origami dragons. The designs range from the simple to an impossible-looking 3-headed beast. The models are a result of a competition held by the Pacific Coast Origami Conference in 2000. All are folded from a single uncut sheet of paper. The 2009 conference is being held this November in San Francisco, & I hope to attend.

The exhibit is clearly an improvised affair, but if you look around carefully, you can find other marvels, such as Robert Lang's incredibly anatomical bugs, Eric Joisel's spiral-shelled snail, Linda Miraha's linked cranes & Brian Chan's WALL-E. I always want to know the dimensions of the original sheet of paper, but for some reason that information is never readily available.

The Paper Tree store itself is still family run & one of the few hold-overs from the post-War revival of Japantown. The highly proprietary staff have posted many signs telling customers how to behave.

5 comments:

The Opera Tattler said...

"The highly proprietary staff have posted many signs telling customers how to behave."

Sounds like my sort of place. When I was a teenager, I had a series of watercolored signs I would use to the same end.

Axel Feldheim said...

These signs said things like "Do not touch", "Do not copy ISBN numbers" & "3 strokes only". What did your signs say?

sfmike said...

What does "3 strokes only" mean?

My favorite bit of behavior modification signage was in the billiards room of an Australian pub which proclaimed that "SPITFIGHTINGS WILL NOT BE TOLERATED!" I never did find out what "spitfightings" were but did get a photo of the sign.

Axel Feldheim said...

i will get back to you on the "3 strokes". i think i need to go back there & get some photographic evidence, though "no photography" may also be an injunction!

i hope none of us ever need to find out what "spitfightings" are.

The Opera Tattler said...

My signs said things like "Silence, please," "Do not touch," and "The end is nigh."